Electronics Engineering Technology

The Associate in Applied Science degree in Electronics Engineering Technology is accepted at some colleges and universities as the first two years of a bachelor’s-level engineering technology program. This program is specifically designed to ease the transition for students planning to join the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) program at UNC Charlotte, but it also can be applied to many other universities. A BSET graduate is known as a technologist.

Electronics Engineering Technicians (associate degree holders) typically build, install, test, troubleshoot, repair, and modify developmental and production electronic components, equipment, and systems such as industrial/computer controls, manufacturing systems, instrumentation systems, communication systems, and power electronic systems.

Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to think critically, analyze, and troubleshoot electronic systems. Beginning with electrical fundamentals, course work progressively introduces electronics, circuit simulation, solid-state fundamentals, digital concepts, instrumentation, C++ programming, microprocessors, programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). Course work includes setup and maintenance of instrumentation devices, PIDs, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), LabVIEW programming, C++, and microprocessors. Other course work includes the study of various fields associated with the electrical/electronic industry.

Complete details, including a flowchart showing a typical schedule of classes per semester for this program, is found on the Electronics Engineering Technology website.

This program is intended for university transfer but also can be used to gain employment after graduation. The Electrical Engineering Technology AAS Degree program is designed as workforce development for immediate employment. Graduates also may seek employment as technicians, engineering assistants, field service engineers, electrical and electronics repairers, electromechanical equipment assemblers, electronics and instrumentation technician, or salespersons in electrical generation/distribution, industrial maintenance, automation, electronic repair or other fields requiring a broad-based knowledge of electrical and electronic concepts.

For specific information about potential positions and wages in Electronics Engineering Technology employment, visit the Central Piedmont Career Coach website.

Electronics Engineering Technology (A40200)

Degree Awarded

The Associate in Applied Science degree - Electronics Engineering Technology is awarded by the college upon completion of the program.

Program Accreditation

The Electronics Engineering Technology program at Central Piedmont is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (TAC of ABET), abet.org.

How to Apply

Visit Get Started on the home page of the Central Piedmont website to apply.

More Information

For a printer-friendly version of this information, download the Electronics Engineering Technology Flyer or the Electronics Engineering Technology Program Educational Objectives found under More Information on the Electronics Engineering Technology web page.

Current departmental news is available at CEEET, the online Computer, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technology Newsletter

If you are in this program or have questions about this program please contact our faculty for advising.

The Electronics Engineering Technology program is in the Engineering Technology Division. For additional information, visit the Engineering Technologies website or call the Engineering Technology Division at 704.330.6860.

General Education Requirements
ENG 111Writing and Inquiry3.0
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Writing and Research in the Disciplines
Literature-Based Research
Professional Research & Reporting
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Introduction to Communication
Public Speaking
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Art Appreciation
Art History Survey I
Art History Survey II
Cultural Studies
Myth in Human Culture
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Jazz
Philosophical Issues
Introduction to Ethics
World Religions
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
American History I
American History II
American Government
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
MAT 171Precalculus Algebra4.0
Major Requirements
ELC 133Circuit Analysis II4.0
ELN 131Analog Electronics I4.0
ELN 133Digital Electronics4.0
ELN 232Introduction to Microprocessors4.0
ELN 260Prog Logic Controllers4.0
Select 1 of following two groups:4.0
Group 1:
Circuit Analysis I
Group 2:
DC Circuit Analysis
AC Circuit Analysis
Other Major Requirements:
CSC 134C++ Programming3.0
PCI 170DAQ and Control4.0
PHY 151College Physics I4.0
or PHY 251 General Physics I
PHY 152College Physics II4.0
or PHY 252 General Physics II
MAT 172Precalculus Trigonometry4.0
MAT 271Calculus I4.0
EGR 110Introduction to Engineering Technology2.0
Total Credits68

No diplomas are offered in Electronics Engineering Technology.

No certificates are offered in Electronics Engineering Technology.

Courses

ELN 131. Analog Electronics I. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 131 Minimum grade C

ELN 132. Analog Electronics II. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course covers additional applications of analog electronic circuits with an emphasis on analog and mixed signal integrated circuits (IC). Topics include amplification, filtering, oscillation, voltage regulation, and other analog circuits. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog electronic circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

ELN 133. Digital Electronics. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

ELN 150. Computer-Aided Drafting for Electronics. 2.0 Credits. Class-1.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces computer-aided drafting (CAD) with an emphasis on applications in the electronics field. Topics include electronics industry standards (symbols, schematic diagrams, layouts); drawing electronic circuit diagrams; and specialized electronic drafting practices and components such as resistors, capacitors, and ICs. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare electronic drawings with CAD software.

ELN 232. Introduction to Microprocessors. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces microprocessor architecture and microcomputer systems including memory and input/output interfacing. Topics include low-level language programming, bus architecture, I/O systems, memory systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor circuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELN 133 Minimum grade C

ELN 233. Microprocessor Systems. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course covers the application and design of microprocessor control systems. Topics include control and interfacing of systems using AD/DA, serial/parallel I/O, communication protocols, and other related applications. Upon completion, students should be able to design, construct, program, verify, analyze, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor interface and control circuits using related equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELN 232

ELN 237. Local Area Networks. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of local area networks and their operation. Topics include the characteristics of network topologies, system hardware, system configuration, installation and operation of the LAN. Upon completion, students should be able to install and maintain a local area network.

Prerequisites: Take ELN 133

ELN 260. Prog Logic Controllers. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course provides a detailed study of PLC applications, with a focus on design of industrial controls using the PLC. Topics include PLC components, memory organization, math instructions, documentation, input/output devices, and applying PLCs in industrial control systems. Upon completion, students should be able to select and program a PLC system to perform a wide variety of industrial control functions.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 213 or ELN 133 with a minimum grade C