Computer Engineering Technology

The AAS degree in Computer Engineering Technology is accepted at some colleges and universities as the first two years of a bachelor’s-level engineering technology program. This program has been designed to include training in both hardware and software, emphasizing operating system concepts to provide a unified view of computer systems.

Computer Engineering Technology focuses on the circuitry of computers and some programming. Beginning with electrical fundamentals, course work progressively introduces electronics, circuit simulation, solid-state fundamentals, digital concepts, instrumentation, C++ programming, microprocessors, microcomputer applications, networking, operating systems, I/O hardware interfacing, industrial applications and data acquisition using LabView. Other course work includes the study of various fields associated with the electrical/electronic industry. Several opportunities for industry certifications are built into the program which allow students to add skills to their resume. Graduates should qualify for employment opportunities in electronics technology, computer service, computer networks, server maintenance, programming, and other areas requiring a knowledge of electronic and computer systems.

The Computer Engineering Technology curriculum provides the skills required to design and implement microprocessor and computer controlled equipment. Graduates should qualify for employment as engineering assistants or either computer, electrical, or electronic technicians with job titles such as electronics engineering technician, field service technician, maintenance technician, communications technician, electronic tester, electronic systems integrator, electronics and instrumentation technician, control technician, bench technician, electromechanical equipment assemblers, electronics and instrumentation technician, computer network support specialists, computer user support specialists, electronic home entertainment equipment installers and repairers.

The AAS degree in Computer Engineering Technology is accepted at some colleges and universities as the first two years of a bachelor’s-level engineering technology program and graduates can transfer to a university program to finish a bachelor’s degree, however there will be deficiencies. The Electronics Engineering Technology AAS Degree program is designed for students planning to continue to a four-year bachelor's degree in engineering technology.

Visit Computer Information Technology website to view degree options in computer programming, web technologies, or computer networking.

For specific information about potential positions and wages in Computer Engineering Technology employment, visit the Central Piedmont Career Coach website.

Computer Engineering Technology (A40160)

Degree Awarded

The Associate in Applied Science Degree - Computer Engineering Technology is awarded by the college upon completion of the program.

The AAS degree in Computer Engineering Technology is accepted at some colleges and universities as the first two years of a 4-year bachelor's-level engineering technology program.

Program Accreditation

The Computer Engineering Technology program at Central Piedmont is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (TAC of ABET), abet.org.

How to Apply

Complete a Central Piedmont admissions application through Get Started on the Central Piedmont website.

Contact Information

For a printer-friendly version of this information, download the Computer Engineering Technology Flyer. Educational Objectives also can be downloaded from the Computer Engineering Technology Program.

Current departmental news can be found in the Computer, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technology Newsletter.

Contact Computer Engineering Technology faculty for advising or with any questions about the program. 

The Computer Engineering Technology program is in the Engineering Technology Division. For additional information, visit the Engineering Technologies website, the program chair at 704.330.6860 or email dave.ross@cpcc.edu.

General Education Requirements
ENG 111Writing and Inquiry3.0
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Writing and Research in the Disciplines
Literature-Based Research
Professional Research & Reporting
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Introduction to Communication
Public Speaking
MAT 171Precalculus Algebra4.0
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
American History I
American History II
American Government
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Select 1 of the following:3.0
Art Appreciation
Art History Survey I
Art History Survey II
Cultural Studies
Myth in Human Culture
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Jazz
Philosophical Issues
Introduction to Ethics
World Religions
Major Requirements
CTI 130Operating Systems and Device Foundation6.0
ELN 131Analog Electronics I4.0
ELN 133Digital Electronics4.0
ELN 232Introduction to Microprocessors4.0
ELN 260Prog Logic Controllers4.0
Select 1 of the following two groups:4.0
Group 1:
Circuit Analysis I
Group 2:
DC Circuit Analysis
AC Circuit Analysis
Other Major Requirements:
MAT 172Precalculus Trigonometry4.0
NET 125Introduction to Networks3.0
NET 126Routing Basics3.0
CSC 134C++ Programming3.0
ELC 133Circuit Analysis II4.0
ELC 135Electrical Machines3.0
EGR 110Introduction to Engineering Technology2.0
Select 1 of the following:4.0
College Physics I
General Physics I
Total Credits71

No diplomas are offered in Computer Engineering Technology.

No certificates are offered in Computer Engineering Technology.

CSC 134. C++ Programming. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level.

Prerequisites: Take DRE 098 or ENG 111 with a minimum grade of C

CTI 130. Operating Systems and Device Foundation. 6.0 Credits. Class-4.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-4.0. Work-0.0

This course covers the basic hardware and software of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interaction with popular microcomputer operating systems. Topics include components identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers.

EGR 110. Introduction to Engineering Technology. 2.0 Credits. Class-1.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces general topics relevant to engineering technology. Topics include career assessment, professional ethics, critical thinking and problem solving, usage of college resources for study and research, and using tools for engineering computations. Upon completion, students should be able to choose a career option in engineering technology and utilize college resources to meet their educational goals.

ELC 131. Circuit Analysis I. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

Corequisites: Take MAT 121 or MAT 171

ELC 133. Circuit Analysis II. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course covers additional concepts of DC/AC electricity, the use of test equipment, and measurement techniques. Topics include the application of network theorems such as delta/wye transformations, Superposition Theorem, and other advanced circuit analysis principles. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and analyze DC/AC circuits used advanced circuit analysis theorems, circuit simulators, and test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 131 Minimum grade C

ELC 138. DC Circuit Analysis. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces DC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, and analyze DC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

ELC 139. AC Circuit Analysis. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include AC voltages, circuit analysis laws and theorems, reactive components and circuits, transformers, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret AC circuit schematics; analyze and troubleshoot AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 138

ELN 131. Analog Electronics I. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 131 Minimum grade C

ELN 133. Digital Electronics. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

ELC 135. Electrical Machines. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers magnetic circuits, transformers, DC/AC machines, and the three-phase circuit fundamentals including power factor. Topics include magnetic terms and calculations, transformer calculations based on primary or secondary equivalent circuits, and regulation and efficiency calculations. Upon completion, students should be able to perform regulation and efficiency calculations for DC/AC machine circuits.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 139 or ELC 131 Minimum grade C

ELN 232. Introduction to Microprocessors. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces microprocessor architecture and microcomputer systems including memory and input/output interfacing. Topics include low-level language programming, bus architecture, I/O systems, memory systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor circuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

Prerequisites: Take ELN 133 Minimum grade C

ELN 260. Prog Logic Controllers. 4.0 Credits. Class-3.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-3.0. Work-0.0

This course provides a detailed study of PLC applications, with a focus on design of industrial controls using the PLC. Topics include PLC components, memory organization, math instructions, documentation, input/output devices, and applying PLCs in industrial control systems. Upon completion, students should be able to select and program a PLC system to perform a wide variety of industrial control functions.

Prerequisites: Take ELC 213 or ELN 133 with a minimum grade C

NET 125. Introduction to Networks. 3.0 Credits. Class-1.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-4.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and computer networks. Topics include introduction to the principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations. Upon completion, students should be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes.

NET 126. Routing Basics. 3.0 Credits. Class-1.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-4.0. Work-0.0

This course focuses on initial router configuration, router software management, routing protocol configuration, TCP/IP, and access control lists (ACLs). Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of router configuration, managing router software, routing protocol, and access lists. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of routers and their role in WANs, router configuration, routing protocols, TCP/IP, troubleshooting, and ACLs.

Prerequisites: Take NET 125 Minimum grade C