Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Courses

GIS 111. Introduction to GIS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems.

GIS 112. Introduction to GPS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course provides an overview of Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Topics include the theory, implementation, and operations of GPS, as well as alternate data source remote sensing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of GPS.

GIS 120. Introduction to Geodesy. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the fundamental concepts behind map projections, datums, and coordinate systems. Topics include the theory of how the earth's shape is defined and how geographic features are positioned using spherical coordinate systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of geodesy as it relates to the measurement and representation of the earth.

GIS 121. Georeferencing & Mapping. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces coordinate systems, fundamentals of surveying, and cartography. Topics include the theory, acquisition, and use of locational data using both continuous and discrete georeferencing methods. Upon completion, students should be able to identify appropriate coordinate systems for a situation and translate data into correct map form.

Corequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 125. CAD for GIS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the concepts of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) as well as software that is used for building geographic data for a GIS. Emphasis is placed on the learning of basic commands used in building spatial data. Upon completion, the student will be able to operate within a CAD environment.

Corequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 215. GIS Data Models. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers interpreting and understanding of a variety data formats available in GIS. Topics include the similarities and differences between data models as well as how data is treated differently within each format, to include the conversion of data between different environments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of GIS data storage and interoperability.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 221. Advanced Topics in GIS. 2.0 Credits. Class-1.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers technical aspects of GIS functions, algorithms, theory of geographical data structures, and error handling. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences requiring manipulation of tools, data, and macros. Upon completion, students should be able to construct a small Geographic Information System.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 222. Internet Mapping. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course is designed as an introduction to multimedia, interactive, animated, and Web cartography. Topics include the principles of effective cartographic communication, and stressing the new and important roles digital cartography is coming to play in cyberspace. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to evaluate digital cartographic information and create effective internet maps.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 225. Advanced Methods in GIS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course promotes the analytic and critical thinking that is required when conducting statistical analysis of geographic data. Emphasis is placed on understanding data at a descriptive level for the conducting of statistical analysis. Upon completion, students will be able to understand the unique characteristics of geo-referenced data.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 230. GIS Data Creation. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of primary GIS data creation. Topics include the collection of field data, digital conversion of existing hardcopy maps, and the construction of spatial data from known geodetic locations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an ability to collect, create, and process spatial data within a variety of environments.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 232. Spatial Databases. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers various stages of spatial database design and implementation, including conceptual models and query languages. Topics include spatial networks, spatial data mining, indexing, and query processing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of spatial databases management systems.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111 GIS 121

GIS 235. Raster GIS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course will provide students with the fundamentals of analyzing remotely sensed data. Emphasis is placed on digital image enhancement as a means to further data analysis. Upon completion, students will be able to accurately interpret and analyze remotely sensed data for use in a raster or vector GIS.

Prerequisites: Take All: GIS 111 and GIS 121

GIS 240. Air Photo Interpretation. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to remote sensing, photogrammetry and various components of land use mapping. Emphasis is placed on the art and science of aerial photo interpretation. Upon completion, students will be able to review, gather and analyze data from diverse forms of image maps.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111

GIS 241. Cartographic Production. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers the application of computerized cartography, to include the science and art of map design. Topics include the use of maps as an effective medium, efficient map layout and large-scale map production. Upon completion, students should be able to create a variety of map products for an audience or client.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111 GIS 121

GIS 245. Introduction to Spatial Analysis. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course is designed to expose students to various components of spatial analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling and decision making with the use of spatial data. Upon completion, students will be able to utilize statistical models in the process of spatial analysis.

Prerequisites: Take All: GIS 111 and GIS 121
Corequisites: Take GIS 225

GIS 246. Principles of Property Mapping. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course covers interpreting and understanding land records, updating parcel data, and utilizing the data for information retrieval and spatial analysis. Topics include the use and development of parcel information, parcel boundaries, and legal land descriptions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of parcel mapping.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111 GIS 121

GIS 249. Remote Sensing. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-0.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces remote sensing and presents an overview of the use of satellite imagery within the field of geospatial technology. Topics will include the principles of remote sensing, satellite platforms, and sensors. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of data sources, uses, and analysis techniques of remote sensing.

Prerequisites: Complete one of the following options:Take GIS 111 and GIS 240
Take GIS 111 and GIS 235

GIS 259. Photogrammetry. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

This course introduces the history and advancements in photogrammetry. Topics will include photogrammetric techniques, aerial cameras, camera calibration, and stereoscopy. Upon completion, students will demonstrate an understanding of the methods and techniques used to gather photogrammetric data.

Prerequisites: Complete one of the following options:Take GIS 111 and GIS 240
Take GIS 235

GIS 261. Programming in GIS. 3.0 Credits. Class-2.0. Clinical-0.0. Lab-2.0. Work-0.0

The course provides an understanding of how to customize GIS software applications by way of modified toolbars, menus, and buttons. Topics include the theory and implementation of the various scripting languages currently in use. Upon completion, students should be able to modify the appearance of interface elements, save interface customizations, and add custom functionality to a GIS application.

Prerequisites: Take GIS 111 GIS 161